Other Skin Conditions

Seborrheic Keratosis

Also known as seborrheic verruca, most people will develop at least one seborrheic keratosis during a lifetime. Fortunately, these lesions are benign and do not become cancerous. They are characterized as brown, black or yellow growths that grow singly or in groups and are flat or slightly elevated. Often they are mistaken for warts. Generally, no treatment is required unless the growth becomes irritated from chafing against clothing. However, because it looks similar in appearance to precancerous growths (actinic keratosis), your dermatologist will likely biopsy the tissue to confirm the diagnosis.


“Rash” is a general term for a wide variety of skin conditions. A rash refers to a change that affects the skin and usually appears as a red patch or small bumps or blisters on the skin. The majority of rashes are harmless and can be treated effectively with over-the-counter anti-itch creams, antihistamines and moisturizing lotions.
Rashes can be a symptom for other skin problems.

  • Atopic Dermatitis, the most common form of eczema.
  • Bacterial Infections, such as impetigo.
  • Contact Dermatitis, a type of eczema caused by coming into contact with an allergen.
  • Chronic skin problems, such as acne, psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis.
  • Fungal Infections, such as ringworm and yeast infection.
  • Viral Infections, such as shingles.


A blister is a soft area of skin filled with a clear fluid. Blisters may form in response to an irritant. Frequently, the blister is caused from friction, such as a coarse fabric rubbing repeatedly against a person’s skin. In other cases, blisters form in response to a chemical or allergic irritant, which is known as contact dermatitis. Some oral and topical drugs may cause blisters to appear. Blisters can also be symptomatic of bacterial or viral skin infections, such as cold sores, chicken pox, shingles, impetigo or ringworm. Lastly, blisters occur when the skin is exposed to a flame, comes in contact with a hot surface or is overexposed to the sun. Most blisters do not require medical attention. The most important information to remember is never to pop or break open a blister. A blister acts as a protective covering for damaged skin and helps prevent infection. If a blister does open on its own, be sure to leave the covering in place to support further healing. Simply wash the area gently with mild soap and water, pat it dry and apply an antibacterial ointment. Cover the blister with bandage to keep it clean. Replace the dressing at least once a day. Watch for signs of infection, such as a white or yellow pus coming from the blister, redness or red streaks around the blister or an increase in skin temperature around the blister.

To avoid blisters, you need to eliminate the irritant. Some simple ways to avoid blisters are to avoid tight clothing, make sure socks and shoes fit properly, and when doing heavy work with your hands, wear work gloves.


Vitiligo refers to the development of white patches anywhere on the skin. With this condition, pigment-forming cells (known as melanocytes) are destroyed by the immune system causing the loss of pigmentation in the skin. Vitiligo usually develops between the ages of 10 and 40. It affects both men and women and appears to be hereditary.

Vitiligo usually affects areas of skin that have been exposed to sun. It also appears in body folds, near moles or at the site of previous skin injury. The condition is permanent and there is no known cure or prevention. However, there are some treatments that can be used to improve the appearance of the skin, such as steroid creams and ultraviolet light therapy.


Pruritus refers to the sensation of itching on the skin. It can be caused by a wide range of skin conditions, including dry skin, infection, fungus, other skin diseases and, rarely, cancer. While anyone can experience pruritus, it is more commonly seen among the elderly, diabetics, people with suppressed immune systems and those with seasonal allergies, like hay fever or eczema. Additionally, there is a type of pruritus, called PUPPP (Pruritic Uticarial Papules and Plaques of Pregnancy) that affects pregnant women.

Keratosis Pilaris

Also known as follicular keratosis, this is a hereditary skin disorder that causes goosebump-like lesions on the back of the arms, thighs or buttocks. The patches of bumps tend to get dry and itchy, particularly during the winter months. Keratosis pilaris occurs at any age. Because it is hereditary, there is no method of prevention. In some cases, it goes away on its own over time; in other cases, the condition is chronic. Keratosis pilaris is not harmful, however, it is very difficult to treat. Keratosis pilaris is caused by a build-up of keratin, a protein in the skin that protects it from infection. Keratin plugs up hair follicles causing the rough, bumpy rash.

To help alleviate symptoms, be sure to keep the affected area moistened at all times and avoid harsh soaps

Hives (Urticaria)

Hives are characterized as itchy red, raised welts (also known as wheals) on the skin’s surface that can spread or join together and form larger areas of raised lesions. They are generally triggered by exposure to an allergen or chemical irritant. They tend to appear suddenly and often disappear equally as suddenly. Hives are usually an allergic reaction to food, medicine or animals. They can also be triggered by sun exposure, stress, excessive perspiration or other, more serious diseases, such as lupus. Anyone can get hives. They are harmless and non-contagious. Hives may itch, burn or sting. They rarely need medical attention as they tend to disappear on their own. However, in persistent cases, your dermatologist may prescribe antihistamines or oral corticosteroids. The best way to prevent hives is to discontinue exposure to the allergic irritant. Hives lasting more than six weeks are known as chronic urticaria or, if there is swelling below the surface of the skin, angioedema. There are no known causes of angioedema, but it can affect internal organs and therefore requires medical attention.

Hidradenitis Suppurative

Considered a severe form of acne, hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic skin inflammation that usually occurs deep in the skin in areas of the body with sweat glands, such as the groin or armpits. It is characterized by a combination of blackheads and red lesions that break open and drain pus, which may cause itching or sweating. As the red bumps grow in size, they can become more painful. Hidradenitis suppurativa occurs when oil glands and hair follicles become blocked with sweat gland fluid, dead skin cells and other elements found in hair follicles. These substances become trapped and push out into the surrounding tissue. A break or cut of the skin then allows bacteria to enter the area and cause the inflammation.


Wrinkles are a natural part of the aging process. They occur most frequently in areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, neck, back of the hands and forearms. Over time, skin gets thinner, drier and less elastic. Ultimately, this causes wrinkles – either fine lines or deep furrows. In addition to sun exposure, premature aging of the skin is associated with smoking, heredity and skin type (higher incidence among people with fair hair, blue-eyes and light skin).

The best prevention for wrinkles is to keep the skin moisturized and use sunscreen and sunblock to prevent additional damage from the sun. We do offer cosmetic procedures to help with wrinkles.